South O’ the Highway

See Alec Baldwin Classic “Beetlejuice” in Theaters and on Broadway

Beetlejuice rises from the dead.

Amagansett actor Alec Baldwin is best known by many people for his Emmy-winning portrayal of President Donald Trump on Saturday Night Live. Others will forever recognize him for his 30 Rock character, Jack Donaghy. Halloween-lovers may have a different iconic role in mind when they hear his name—Adam from Beetlejuice. Now, to celebrate the film’s 30th anniversary during the month of ghosts and ghouls, fans can watch screenings of the undead cult classic in select theaters.

According to Entertainment Weekly, the newly remastered Tim Burton classic received a domestic re-release on September 28 in a limited number of theaters for a few select dates. This month, Beetlejuice will also be screened in Great Britain, France, Spain, Switzerland, Taiwan, Australia and Latin America.

The 30th anniversary celebrations don’t stop there! A musical adaptation of the film, directed by Alex Timbers, is set to hit Broadway this March. Deadline reports that its pre-Broadway world premiere will be at the National Theatre in Washington D.C, with previews beginning on October 14.

First released in March 1988, Beetlejuice starred Baldwin as Adam and Geena Davis as his wife, Barbara. The two meet their untimely death and must come to terms with haunting their own home. After a new couple moves in, played by Catherine O’Hara and Jeffrey Jones, any attempts to scare them away fail miserably, requiring them to seek help from a kooky ghost named Beetlejuice. Far different from your typical specter, Michael Keaton plays the character more like a fast-talking, slimy used car salesman. Quirky characters coupled with Burton’s macabre imagination, resulted in a timeless Halloween comedy.

In other Baldwin news, the SNL star brought his talent to a dramatic reading of Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman on September 29. This one-time performance at the University of Michigan was followed by an on-stage interview conducted by UM theater professor Daniel Cantor.

Facebook Comments

Show More

Related Articles