Blog Du Jour

Southampton Historical Museum Journals: March 2015

The Southampton Historical Museum’s special journaling project is concluding its third month next week, so it’s time to look back and enjoy some of the March entries.

About 60 Southampton residents have been keeping daily journals since January 1, 2015. After 365 days—on December 31, 2015—the journals will be submitted to the Southampton Historical Museum archive, where they will be kept for future generations to research and enjoy. The project—which will provide an in-depth and uniquely enlightening window into this time and place—is being done in conjunction with Southampton’s 375th anniversary, and the journals will be included in a major Southampton 375 exhibition at the Rogers Mansion in the spring and summer of 2016.

These select entries from March 2015, furnished by the Southampton Historical Museum and the journaling project members, are edited only for spelling and basic grammar.

Bozenna Urbanowicz Gilbride, Polish Catholic Holocaust Survivor, Author Children of Terror
Monday, February 23–Friday, March 6, 2015
Two weeks of speaking to students in 10 schools in Georgia as a Polish Catholic Holocaust survivor. 10 schools invited me, but due to 2 inches of snow, two schools were closed. My story of survival was well received. The Gwinnett Daily Post carried a good story about my visit to Sweetwater Middle School. At North Gwinnett Middle School there were a total of 700 students. Received a standing ovation and they chanted “Grandma, Grandma.” They found out that students in Florida have adopted me as their “Grandma.” Oh well, better to be called Grandma than not to be called at all.

Trudy Ainge Driftwood for March Journals - Southampton Historical Museum
Driftwood and barnacles, Photo from journal of Trudy Ainge

Trudy Ainge, Chef
Monday, March 9, 2015
Look at this fantastic piece of driftwood on the beach in Bridgehampton – barnacles on the base, just like a boat or a sea bollard. A beautiful piece of natural artwork. We found 6 dead birds on the beach, seagulls, cormorant, duck and a couple of unidentifiable ones. Also either a sea lion or seal carcass. Lola found that off in the distance so we went to investigate. Only half decomposed but we couldn’t definitely identify it.

Matt Nuccio from his own journal Southampton Historical Museum
Matt Nuccio from his own journal

Matt Nuccio, Financial Planner, Ameriprise
Sunday, March 15, 2015
Time for some late winter/early spring cleaning. We’ve got some extra stuff we just don’t need in the cottage (including our colorful Sombrero), so we’re bringing it to the basement. Not to mention a full sweep and wiping down surfaces. Just can’t wait for spring, and to be able to see the grass again!

Oliver Peterson, Web Editor, DansPapers.com
Sunday, March 15, 2015
Most of the snow that’s been here for weeks and weeks and weeks has melted. With it going comes tons of dog sh_t revealed all over our yard. We usually clean it up very well, but snow made some of that impossible. I picked up like 15 lbs. of dog crap! Colleen’s business has been booming, so we watched a lot of dogs here over the last few months. Visited mom at her house. She goes to NYC for surgery and doctor consult early Tuesday morning. Surgery is Thursday. My brothers and I are are going to go in and be there for her when she’ out.

Hilary Herrick Woodward, Journaling Project Founder and Co-Coordinator
Saturday, March 21, 2015
It snowed just enough over the last eighteen hours to give us yet another glorious ski this morning. Will it be our last? The woods had a magical white coating and the air was crisp. Afterwards, I went with Annie B. over to the Riverhead Farmers Market. Got some of Art Ludlow’s incredible pork chops.  The hydroponic lettuce guy was not there, but coleslaw from Sang Lee’s root cellar cabbage and carrots will be perfect. A fun evening playing Mexican Train with friends.

Check back for more entries from the Southampton Historical Museum journaling project. Previous months: January, February

For more information, visit southamptonhistoricalmuseum.org or check out the journaling project on Tumblr.

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