Hampton Eats

Top 5 Martha Stewart Recipes to Brighten Up Your Chanukah

For a goy, she makes a great latke.

Chanukah is a time of great celebration for many East Enders, when families come together for eight nights to light the menorah, spin the dreidel and eat lots of fried food. As with every major holiday, East Hamptonite Martha Stewart has a wellspring of recipes for just the occasion. If you’re looking to give grandma’s recipes a year off or simply add something fresh into the mix, try these tasty holiday treats.

Latkes are a classic snack this time of year and rival French fries in their fried potato-y goodness. While there’s nothing wrong with leaving the basic potato pancake recipe as it is, why not add an extra bit of surprise flavor?

The first calls for replacing half of the potatoes in the recipe with Brussels sprouts, which is a great way to get your children to eat their greens. If you—or your kids—don’t care for the bite-sized cabbages, the Martha Stewart team drafted near-identical recipes for beets, carrots and parsnips. If you’re feeling extra adventurous, you could use just about any vegetable you want. Eggplant latkes, anyone? Each recipe takes about an hour to make two dozen pancakes. Check out the full details on the Martha Stewart website: Brussels sprouts, beets, carrots, parsnips.

Once you create the perfect latke, you’ll need the perfect sauce to pair it with. And that means turning nine red-skin apples into one quart of delicious pink applesauce. With a bit of cinnamon, nutmeg, apple cider and ginger, guests will be putting this sweet sauce on everything from the sufganiyot to the brisket. Check out the full recipe.

Speaking of those habit-forming jelly doughnuts, Stewart has a great recipe for glittered sufganiyot. The recipe is a bit complex, but the end result is two dozen raspberry-filled sugary delights that will have the family begging for more. Check out the recipe.

This next one’s a real treat: chocolate marshmallow dreidels! After using a kosher marshmallow, Hershey’s kiss and pretzel stick to create the top, draw the four Hebrew letters found on a non-Israeli dreidel— נ (Nun), ג (Gimmel), ה (Hey) and ש (Shin)—with white chocolate. These letters serve as an acronym for, “A great miracle happened there,” referring to the Chanukah story. Interestingly, dreidels found in Israel replace the last letter with פ (Pey), signifying that, “A great miracle happened here.” Watch the helpful video below or read the full recipe.

Of course, you can’t play a proper game of dreidel without some gelt at stake. If you don’t want to use actual money, chocolate coins make an excellent substitution, and Stewart’s are worth playing for. All you need is some dark chocolate, cacao nibs, grated orange zest, candied ginger and a little safflower oil to create a dozen bittersweet delights in under an hour. Check out this super simple recipe.

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